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Year : 2010  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 47  |  Page : 70--76

Sleep disturbance due to noise: Current issues and future research


Division of Health Science and Centre for Air Transport and the Environment, Manchester Metropolitan University, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Ken Hume
Division of Health Science & CATE, John Dalton Bldg., MMU, Chester St., Manchester M15GD
United Kingdom
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1463-1741.63206

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There is growing interest in carrying out further research to understand and reduce the impact of aircraft noise on airport neighborhood in anticipation of the projected substantial increase in global aviation. Soundscapes provide new analytical methods and a broader, more comprehensive appreciation of the aural environment, which may have a useful role in understanding noise-induced sleep disturbance and annoyance. Current noise metrics like Leq do not provide a common language to report noise environment to residents, which is a key obstacle to effective noise management and acceptance. Non-auditory effects complicate the production of consistent dose-response functions for aircraft noise affecting sleep and annoyance. There are various end-points that can be chosen to assess the degree of sleep disturbance, which has detracted from the clarity of results that has been communicated to wider audiences. The World Health Organization (WHO-Europe) has produced Night Noise Guidelines for Europe, which act as a clear guide for airports and planners to work towards. Methodological inadequacies and the need for simpler techniques to record sleep will be considered with the exciting potential to greatly increase cost-effective field data acquisition, which is needed for large scale epidemiological studies






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