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 ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 55  |  Page : 432--443

Increased vitamin plasma levels in Swedish military personnel treated with nutrients prior to automatic weapon training


1 Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
2 Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Audiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Center for Hearing and Communication Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
3 Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Audiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Technical Audiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
4 Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Audiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Department of Audiology and Neurotology, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden
5 Center for Statistical Consultation and Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
6 Department of Otolaryngology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
7 Division of Surgery, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, IL, USA
8 Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Audiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Otolaryngology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Correspondence Address:
C G Le Prell
Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, Box 100174, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32610
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 22122960

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Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a significant clinical, social, and economic issue. The development of novel therapeutic agents to reduce NIHL will potentially benefit multiple very large noise-exposed populations. Oxidative stress has been identified as a significant contributor to noise-induced sensory cell death and NIHL, and several antioxidant strategies have now been suggested for potential translation to human subjects. One such strategy is a combination of beta-carotene, vitamins C and E, and magnesium, which has shown promise for protection against NIHL in rodent models, and is being evaluated in a series of international human clinical trials using temporary (military gunfire, audio player use) and permanent (stamping factory, military airbase) threshold shift models (NCT00808470). The noise exposures used in the recently completed Swedish military gunfire study described in this report did not, on average, result in measurable changes in auditory function using conventional pure-tone thresholds and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) amplitudes as metrics. However, analysis of the plasma samples confirmed significant elevations in the bloodstream 2 hours after oral consumption of active clinical supplies, indicating the dose is realistic. The plasma outcomes are encouraging, but clinical acceptance of any novel therapeutic critically depends on demonstration that the agent reduces noise-induced threshold shift in randomized, placebo-controlled, prospective human clinical trials. Although this noise insult did not induce hearing loss, the trial design and study protocol can be applied to other populations exposed to different noise insults.






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