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Year : 2012  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 60  |  Page : 227--229

Exposure to industrial wideband noise increases connective tissue in the rat liver


1 Department of Anatomy and UMIB of ICBAS, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
2 Engineering Faculty, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
3 Laboratory of Ecotoxicology and Ecology of CIIMAR (Interdisciplinary Centre for Marine and Environmental Research), University of Porto, Porto, Portugal

Correspondence Address:
Maria João R Oliveira
Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas de Abel Salazar - ICBAS, Departamento de Anatomia, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira n.º 228, 4050-313 Porto
Portugal
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1463-1741.102959

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Rats were daily exposed (eight hours/day) for a period of four weeks to the same high-intensity wideband noise that was recorded before in a large textile plant. Histologic observation of liver sections of the rats was used to perform quantitative comparison of hepatic connective tissue (dyed by Masson trichromic staining) between the noise-exposed and control animals. For that, we have photographed at random centrolobular areas of stained rat liver sections. We found that noise exposure resulted in significant enhancement in the area of collagen-rich connective tissue present in the centrolobular domain of the rat liver. Our data strengthen previous evidence showing that fibrotic transformation is a systemic effect of chronic exposure of rodents and humans to industrial wideband noise.






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