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Year : 2013  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 67  |  Page : 406--411

Qualitative and quantitative assessment of noise at moderate intensities on extra-auditory system in adult rats


1 Laboratory of Integrated Physiology, Faculty of Sciences of Bizerte, Carthage University, Jarzouna; Laboratory of Toxicology, Ergonomics and Occupational Environment, Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, El-Manar University, Tunisia
2 Laboratory of Toxicology, Ergonomics and Occupational Environment, Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, El-Manar University, Tunisia
3 Laboratory of Integrated Physiology, Faculty of Sciences of Bizerte, Carthage University, Jarzouna, Tunisia
4 Research Unit 01/UR/08-07, Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, El-Manar University, Tunisia

Correspondence Address:
Noura Gannouni
Imm Elezz Villa, J11 Radès Méliane, Radès 2040, Tunis
Tunisia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1463-1741.121236

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Noise has long been realized as an environmental stress causing physiological, psychological and behavioral changes in humans. The aim of the present study was to determinate the effect of chronic noise at moderate intensities on both glandular and cardiac function and oxidative status. Our problem comes from working conditions in call centers where operators are responsible for making simple and repetitive tasks. One wishes to ascertain the effects of moderate sound levels on rats exposed to the same noise levels during similar periods to those experienced by call center operators. Male Wistar rats were exposed to 70 and 85 dB(A) to an octave-band noise (8-16 kHz) 6 h/day for 3 month. Corticosterone levels, oxidative status and functional exploration of adrenal and thyroid glands and cardiac tissue were determined. Exposure to long-term noise for different intensities (70 and 85 dB(A)) resulted in increased corticosterone levels, affected various parameters of the endocrine glands and cardiac function. Markers of oxidative stress (catalase, superoxide dismutase and lipid peroxidation) were increased. These results imply that long-term exposure to noise even at moderate levels may enhance physiological function related to neuroendocrine modulation and oxidative imbalance. In these data, the physiological changes occur during the different sounds suggests the concept of allostatic load or homeostatic response of the body.






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