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Year : 2016  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 81  |  Page : 98--103

Student's music exposure: Full-day personal dose measurements


1 Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA
2 Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of North CarolinMusic Research Institute, School of Music, Theatre and Dance, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, North Carolinaa, USA

Correspondence Address:
Susan L Phillips
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, North Carolina
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1463-1741.178510

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Previous studies have shown that collegiate level music students are exposed to potentially hazardous sound levels. Compared to professional musicians, collegiate level music students typically do not perform as frequently, but they are exposed to intense sounds during practice and rehearsal sessions. The purpose of the study was to determine the full-day exposure dose including individual practice and ensemble rehearsals for collegiate student musicians. Sixty-seven college students of classical music were recruited representing 17 primary instruments. Of these students, 57 completed 2 days of noise dose measurements using Cirrus doseBadge programed according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health criterion. Sound exposure was measured for 2 days from morning to evening, ranging from 7 to 9 h. Twenty-eight out of 57 (49%) student musicians exceeded a 100% daily noise dose on at least 1 day of the two measurement days. Eleven student musicians (19%) exceeded 100% daily noise dose on both days. Fourteen students exceeded 100% dose during large ensemble rehearsals and eight students exceeded 100% dose during individual practice sessions. Approximately, half of the student musicians exceeded 100% noise dose on a typical college schedule. This finding indicates that a large proportion of collegiate student musicians are at risk of developing noise-induced hearing loss due to hazardous sound levels. Considering the current finding, there is a need to conduct hearing conservation programs in all music schools, and to educate student musicians about the use and importance of hearing protection devices for their hearing.






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