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Year : 2016  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 82  |  Page : 143--149

Lack of contralateral suppression in transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions in multiple chemical sensitivity: a clinical correlation study


1 Department of Clinical Sciences and Traslational Medicine; Department of Systems Medicine, Neuroscience Unit, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Rome, Italy
2 Department of Clinical Sciences and Traslational Medicine, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Rome, Italy
3 Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome 'La Sapienza', Rome, Italy

Correspondence Address:
Andrea Viziano
Department of Clinical Sciences and Traslational Medicine, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Rome
Italy
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1463-1741.181997

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Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic disorder characterized by a variety of symptoms associated with the exposure to chemicals at a concentration below the toxic level. Previous studies have demonstrated peculiar responses in brain activity in these patients with respect to sensory stimuli while the association between chemical sensitivity and other environmental intolerances such as noise sensitivity has been questioned by researchers. In this study, a cohort of 18 MCS patients underwent transient-evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) testing with and without contralateral suppression to evaluate the functionality of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) reflex involved in speech-in-noise sensitivity. Results were compared with an age- and gender-matched control group (n = 20) and correlation analysis with disease onset and quick environmental exposure sensitivity inventory (qEESI) symptom severity scale was performed. Subjects affected by MCS showed statistically significant impairment of MOC reflex, and the onset of the disease and several symptom subscales showed to be correlated to such reduction in some of the frequencies tested. These data suggest that alterations of MOC reflex could be part of the complex features of this disease although more studies are needed to further explore auditory perception disorders in environmental intolerances.






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