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Year : 2016  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 82  |  Page : 157--165

Hearing loss in the Royal Norwegian Navy: A longitudinal study


1 Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, Research Group for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University of Bergen; Department of Occupational Medicine, The Norwegian Centre for Maritime Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway
2 Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, Research Group for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
3 Department of Audiology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway
4 Royal Norwegian Navy Medical Services, Haakonsvern, Bergen, Norway
5 Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway

Correspondence Address:
Kaja Irgens-Hansen
Arstadveien 21, Bergen - 5009
Norway
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1463-1741.181999

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The aims of this longitudinal study were to investigate a significant threshold shift (STS) among personnel working on board the Royal Norwegian Navy's (RNoN) vessels between 2012 and 2014 and to identify possible determinants of STS. Hearing thresholds were measured by pure tone audiometry in two consecutive examinations (n = 226). STS was defined as an average change in hearing thresholds ≥ + 10 dB at 2,000 Hz, 3,000 Hz, and 4,000 Hz in either ear. Determinants of STS were assessed through a questionnaire. The incidence of STS was 23.0%. Significant determinants of STS were the number of episodes of temporary threshold shifts (TTS) in the Navy, exposure to continuous loud noise during work on board, and the number of gun shots (in the Navy, hunting, and sports). This study indicated a significant association between noise exposure on board Navy vessels and development of STS.






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