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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 83  |  Page : 178--184

Characteristics of hyperacusis in the general population


1 Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
2 Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå; Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden

Correspondence Address:
Johan Paulin
Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå
Sweden
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1463-1741.189244

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There is a need for better understanding of various characteristics in hyperacusis in the general population. The objectives of the present study were to investigate individuals in the general population with hyperacusis regarding demographics, lifestyle, perceived general health and hearing ability, hyperacusis-specific characteristics and behavior, and comorbidity. Using data from a large-scale population-based questionnaire study, we investigated individuals with physician-diagnosed (n = 66) and self-reported (n = 313) hyperacusis in comparison to individuals without hyperacusis (n = 2995). High age, female sex, and high education were associated with hyperacusis, and that trying to avoid sound sources, being able to affect the sound environment, and having sough medical attention were common reactions and behaviors. Posttraumatic stress disorder, chronic fatigue syndrome, generalized anxiety disorder, depression, exhaustion, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, migraine, hearing impairment, tinnitus, and back/joint/muscle disorders were comorbid with hyperacusis. The results provide ground for future study of these characteristic features being risk factors for development of hyperacusis and/or consequences of hyperacusis.






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