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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 20  |  Issue : 92  |  Page : 9--15

Influences of combined traffic noise on the ability of learning and memory in mice


Department of Environmental Science, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, PR China

Correspondence Address:
Guo-Qing Di
Department of Environmental Science, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, No. 866 Yuhangtang Road, Hangzhou 310058
PR China
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/nah.NAH_27_17

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Objective: The present study aimed to evaluate the influences of combined traffic noise (CTN) on the ability of learning and memory in mice. Materials and Methods: The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice were exposed to CTN from highways and high-speed railways for 42 days, whose day–night equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure level (Ldn) was 70 dB(A). On the basis of behavioral reactions in Morris water maze (MWM) and the concentrations of amino acid neurotransmitters in the hippocampus, the impacts of CTN on learning and memory in mice were examined. Results: The MWM test showed that the ability of learning and memory in mice was improved after short-term exposure (6–10 days, the first batch) to 70 dB(A) CTN, which showed the excitatory effect of stimuli. Long-term exposure (26–30 days, the third batch; 36–40 days, the fourth batch) led to the decline of learning and memory ability, which indicated the inhibitory effect of stimuli. Assays testing amino acid neurotransmitters showed that the glutamate level of the experimental group was higher than that of the control group in the first batch. However, the former was lower than the latter in the third and fourth batches. Both, behavioral reactions and the concentrations of amino acid neurotransmitters, testified that short-term exposure and long-term exposure resulted in excitatory effect and inhibitory effect on the ability of learning and memory, respectively. Conclusion: The effects of 70 dB(A) CTN on the ability of learning and memory were closely related to the exposure duration. Furthermore, those effects were regulated and controlled by the level of glutamate in the hippocampus.






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