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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 98  |  Page : 1--6

Sensitivity and Specificity of Automated Audiometry in Subjects with Normal Hearing or Hearing Impairment


1 Unit of Audiology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet; Center for Hearing and communication research, Karolinska Institutet; Department of Audiology and Neurotology, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden
2 Unit of Audiology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden
3 Unit of Audiology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet; Unit of Audiology, Department of Health and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg; Audiology Department, Habilitation & Health, Region Västra Götaland, Sweden

Correspondence Address:
Åsa Skjonsberg
Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Alfred Nobels Allé 10, 141 83 Huddinge
Sweden
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/nah.NAH_18_17

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Objective: To investigate the sensitivity and specificity in an automatic computer-controlled audiometric set-up, used for screening purposes. Design: Comparison between standardized audiometry and automated audiometry performed in the same participants. Study Sample: In total, 100 participants (51 females and 49 males) were recruited to take part of this study the same day they visited the hearing clinic for clinical audiometry. Ages varied between 18 and 84 years (mean 45.9 in females, 52.3 in males). Results: The participants were divided into groups, dependent of type of hearing. A total of 23 had normal hearing, 40 had sensorineural hearing loss, 19 had conductive hearing loss and 18 showed asymmetric hearing loss. The sensitivity for the automated audiometry was 86%–100% and the specificity 56%–100%. The group with conductive hearing loss showed the poorest sensitivity (86 %) and specificity (56 %). The group with sensorineural hearing loss showed the smallest variation in difference between the two methods. Conclusions: The results show that automated audiometry is a method suitable to screen for hearing loss. Screening levels need to be selected with respect to cause of screening and environmental factors. For patients with asymmetric hearing thresholds it is necessary to consider the effect of transcranial routing of signals.






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