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Figure 1: Illustration of the principle of the Threshold Equalizing Noise test (TEN [SPL]) test. The basilar membrane vibration of a 1.5 kHz tone is represented by the solid curve. (a) The shaded area reflects a dead zone starting at 1.07 kHz. 40 dB of basilar membrane vibration is needed (long-dashed line) in order to measure absolute thresholds below 1.07 kHz. The short-dashed line represents the absolute threshold value of a 1.5 kHz tone, which is 67 dB. A threshold is measurable due to intact IHC's adjacent to the dead region. (b) A TEN of 70 dB/ERBN is added to mask the 1.5 kHz tone at 67 dB. In case of a dead region, the intensity of the tone needs to be raised substantially in order to achieve audibility again. This figure was derived from Moore et al. 2004[7]

Figure 1: Illustration of the principle of the Threshold Equalizing Noise test (TEN [SPL]) test. The basilar membrane vibration of a 1.5 kHz tone is represented by the solid curve. (a) The shaded area reflects a dead zone starting at 1.07 kHz. 40 dB of basilar membrane vibration is needed (long-dashed line) in order to measure absolute thresholds below 1.07 kHz. The short-dashed line represents the absolute threshold value of a 1.5 kHz tone, which is 67 dB. A threshold is measurable due to intact IHC's adjacent to the dead region. (b) A TEN of 70 dB/ERBN is added to mask the 1.5 kHz tone at 67 dB. In case of a dead region, the intensity of the tone needs to be raised substantially in order to achieve audibility again. This figure was derived from Moore <i>et al</i>. 2004<sup>[7]</sup>