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LITERATURE UPDATE Table of Contents   
Year : 2006  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 30  |  Page : 59
Long-term assessment of auditory changes resulting from a single noise exposure associated with non-occupational activities

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How to cite this article:
Schmuzigert N, Fostiropoulos K, Probst R. Long-term assessment of auditory changes resulting from a single noise exposure associated with non-occupational activities. Noise Health 2006;8:59

How to cite this URL:
Schmuzigert N, Fostiropoulos K, Probst R. Long-term assessment of auditory changes resulting from a single noise exposure associated with non-occupational activities. Noise Health [serial online] 2006 [cited 2020 Nov 26];8:59. Available from: https://www.noiseandhealth.org/text.asp?2006/8/30/59/32472
We examined the long-term sequelae in both ears of 42 patients who reported the occurrence of auditory changes resulting from a single exposure to intense sound levels during non-occupational activities. We divided these patients into two groups, based upon noise exposures of either continuous duration or single high-energy impulse. Audiometric data were available for each of these subjects shortly after their noise-exposure events and follow-up examinations took place more than one year after the noise occurrence (range: 1-16 years). The initial median hearing loss for the continuous-type noise exposure group at 3-8 kHz was found to be 9 dB, relative to the age-appropriate norms, in the more affected ears, and hearing function was found to have returned to normal levels at follow-up. The same initial hearing loss was measured for the impulse-type noise group, but a residual hearing loss of 4 dB was measured at follow-up. Furthermore, the majority of the subjects from both groups reported tinnitus and hypersensitivity to sound at follow-up, but with minimal impact on their lives.

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