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 ARTICLE
Year : 2006  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 33  |  Page : 147--153

The use of hearing protection devices by older adults during recreational noise exposure


1 Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA
2 Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences; Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA
3 Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences; Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA
4 Department of Speech and Hearing Science, Arizona State University, Tempe, USA

Correspondence Address:
D M Nondahl
Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin, 610 Walnut Street, Room 1040, Madison, WI 53726-2397
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1463-1741.34702

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A population-based study to assess the use of hearing protection devices by older adults during noisy recreational activities was performed. The population-based Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study was designed to measure the prevalence of hearing loss in adults residing in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. The use of hearing protection devices during noisy recreational activities was assessed by performing three examinations over a period of 10 years (1993-1995, no. of participants (n) = 3753, aged 48-92 years; 1998-2000, n = 2800, aged 53-97 years; 2003-2005, n = 2395, aged 58-100 years). The recreational activities included hunting, target shooting, woodworking/carpentry, metalworking, driving loud recreational vehicles, and performing yard work using either power tools or a chain saw. The prevalence of using hearing protection devices during any of these activities increased with time (9.5%, 15.0%, and 19.9% at baseline, 5 years, and 10 years, respectively). However, the use of hearing protection devices remained low for most activities. Those under the age of 65 were twice as likely to use hearing protection devices during noisy activities than were older adults. Men, those with a hearing handicap, and those with significant tinnitus were more likely to use hearing protection devices. Smokers and the less educated were less likely to use hearing protection devices. The results demonstrated that many adults expose themselves to potentially damaging recreational noise, leaving them at risk for hearing loss.






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