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Year : 2009  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 42  |  Page : 33--48

Principles and application of educational counseling used in progressive audiologic tinnitus management


1 VA RR and D National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon; Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU), Portland, Oregon, USA
2 VA RR and D National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA
3 James A. Haley, VA Medical Center, Tampa, FL, USA
4 Yale University, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT; VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA

Correspondence Address:
James A Henry
VA RR and D National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon; Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU), Portland, Oregon
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1463-1741.45311

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Exposure to loud sounds is a common cause and exacerbater of tinnitus - a troubling auditory symptom that affects millions of people worldwide. Clinical research at the National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research has resulted in a clinical model of tinnitus management referred to as Progressive Audiologic Tinnitus Management (PATM). The model involves five hierarchical levels of management: Triage, Audiologic Evaluation, Group Education, Tinnitus Evaluation, and Individualized Management. Counseling by audiologists and, as needed, mental health providers, is a key component of PATM. This style of counseling focuses less on didactic informational counseling; instead, counseling is used for facilitating patients' learning to adjust to the disturbing auditory symptom by successfully employing tools from two powerful skillsets for self-management of chronic tinnitus - the therapeutic uses of sound and techniques from cognitive-behavioral psychology. This article provides an overview of the methods of counseling used with PATM and provides details concerning the overarching principles of collaborative adult learning that are believed to be most important in facilitating self-management by patients who complain of tinnitus.






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