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Year : 2011  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 51  |  Page : 122--131

Hearing loss prevention for carpenters: Part 2 - Demonstration projects using individualized and group training


1 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Division of Applied Research and Technology, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226-1998, USA
2 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Education and Information Division ,4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226-1998, USA

Correspondence Address:
Mark R Stephenson
NIOSH, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226-1998
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1463-1741.77213

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Two demonstration projects were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a comprehensive training program for carpenters. This training was paired with audiometry and counseling and a survey of attitudes and beliefs in hearing loss prevention. All participants received hearing tests, multimedia instruction on occupational noise exposure/hearing loss, and instruction and practice in using a diverse selection of hearing protection devices (HPDs). A total of 103 apprentice carpenters participated in the Year 1 training, were given a large supply of these HPDs, and instructions on how to get additional free supplies if they ran out during the 1-year interval between initial and follow-up training. Forty-two participants responded to the survey a second time a year later and completed the Year 2 training. Significant test-retest differences were found between the pre-training and the post-training survey scores. Both forms of instruction (individual versus group) produced equivalent outcomes. The results indicated that training was able to bring all apprentice participants up to the same desired level with regard to attitudes, beliefs, and behavioral intentions to use hearing protection properly. It was concluded that the health communication models used to develop the educational and training materials for this effort were extremely effective.






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