Home Email this page Print this page Bookmark this page Decrease font size Default font size Increase font size
Noise & Health  
 CURRENT ISSUE    PAST ISSUES    AHEAD OF PRINT    SEARCH   GET E-ALERTS    
 
 Next article
 Previous article
Table of Contents

Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
Citation Manager
Access Statistics
Reader Comments
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed6875    
    Printed371    
    Emailed4    
    PDF Downloaded37    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 8    

Recommend this journal

 

 ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 51  |  Page : 132--141

Effects of training on hearing protector attenuation


1 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Division of Applied Research and Technology, Engineering and Physical Hazards Branch, Hearing Loss Prevention Team, Cincinnati, OH 45226-1998, USA
2 Howard Leight Acoustical Test Laboratory, Sperian Hearing Protection, LLC 7828 Waterville Road, San Diego, CA 92154, USA

Correspondence Address:
William J Murphy
Captain, U.S. Public Health Service, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 4676 Columbia Parkway, MS C-27, Cincinnati OH 45226-1998
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: Partially supported by The Environmental Protection Agency through interagency agreement DW75921973-01-0, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1463-1741.77215

Rights and Permissions

The effect of training instruction, whether presented as the manufacturer's printed instructions, a short video training session specific to the product, or as a one-on-one training session was evaluated using four hearing protection devices with eight groups of subjects. Nave subjects were recruited and tested using three different forms of training: written, video, and individual training. The group averages for A-weighted attenuation were not statistically significant when compared between the video or the written instruction conditions, regardless of presentation order. The experimenter-trained A-weighted attenuations were significantly greater than the written and video instruction for most of the protectors and groups. For each earplug, the noise reduction statistic for A-weighting (NRS A ) and the associated confidence intervals were calculated for the 80 th and 20 th percentiles of protection. Across subject groups for each protector, the differences between NRS A ratings were found to be not statistically significant. Several comparisons evaluating the order of testing, the type of testing, and statistical tests of the performance across the groups are presented.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article