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 ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 53  |  Page : 261--271

Using the Extended Parallel Process Model to create and evaluate the effectiveness of brochures to reduce the risk for noise-induced hearing loss in college students


1 School of Communication Studies, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 293 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996
2 Department of Communication, Michigan State University, 573A Communication Arts and Sciences Building, East Lansing, MI 48824
3 Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Tennessee, Health Science Center, 444 S. Stadium Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996

Correspondence Address:
Michael R Kotowski
School of Communication Studies, University of Tennessee - Knoxville, 293 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1463-1741.82958

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Brochures containing messages developed according to the Extended Parallel Process Model were deployed to increase intentions to use hearing protection for college students. These brochures were presented to one-half of a college student sample, after which a questionnaire was administered to assess perceptions of threat, efficacy, and behavioral intentions. The other half of the sample completed the questionnaire and then received brochures. Results indicated that people receiving the brochure before the questionnaire reported greater perceptions of hearing loss threat and efficacy to use ear plugs when in loud environments, however, intentions to use ear plugs were unchanged. Distribution of the brochure also resulted in greater perceptions of hearing loss threat and efficacy to use over-the-ear headphones when using devices such as MP3 players. In this case, however, intentions to use over-the-ear headphones increased. Results are discussed in terms of future research and practical applications.






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