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Year : 2012  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 61  |  Page : 313--314

Combined Exposures: An update from the International comission on biological effects of noise


1 School of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, C.P. 6128, succ. Centre ville, Montreal (Quebec), Canada
2 Department of Safety, Security and Environment, Transportøkonomisk Institutt, Gaustadalléen 21, 0349 Oslo, Norway

Correspondence Address:
Tony Leroux
School of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, C.P. 6128, succ. Centre ville, Montreal (Quebec)
Canada
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1463-1741.104900

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International Commission on Biological Effects of Noise (ICBEN) Team 8 deals with the effects of combined "agents" in the urban and work place settings. Results presented at the ICBEN conference indicate that some pesticides, more specifically the organophosphates, and a wider range of industrial chemicals are harmful to the auditory system at concentrations often found in occupational settings. Effects of occupational noise on hearing are exacerbated by toluene and possibly by carbon monoxide. Several of the chemicals studied found to be potentially toxic not only to hair cells in the cochlea but also to the auditory nerve. In urban environments, team 8 focuses on additive and synergetic effects of ambient stressors. It was argued that noise policies need to pay attention to grey areas with intermediate noise levels. Noteworthy is also stronger reactions to vibrations experienced in the evening and during the night. An innovative event-based model for sound perception was presented.






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