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 ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 71  |  Page : 205--207

Noise measurement in total knee arthroplasty


1 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
2 Department of Safety Engineering, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Lukas A Holzer
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 5, 8036 Graz
Austria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1463-1741.137040

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Few studies have been performed to analyze noise levels produced by various surgical instruments in the operating room (OR). The highest levels of noise that have been described were due to instruments used for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). These high levels of noise might be a potential health hazard for patients and medical staff. Therefore, we aimed to measure noise levels of current instruments that are widely used worldwide. During a conventional primary TKA the levels of noise in the OR were measured using a Class 1 integrating-averaging sound level meter. The highest A-weighted equivalent level was produced when using a hammer during the implantation of the femoral and tibial components with 90.2 dBA. In total surgical instruments were used for about 10% of the total time of surgery. Noise exposure due to instrument use during TKA does not seem to be a potential health hazard for medical staff or patients.






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