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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 108  |  Page : 1--10

Residential traffic noise exposure and headaches: Results from the population-based heinz nixdorf recall study


1 Centre for Urban Epidemiology (CUE), Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (IMIBE), University Hospital Essen, Essen,Department of Family and Community Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Rabigh, Saudi Arabia, Germany
2 Centre for Urban Epidemiology (CUE), Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (IMIBE), University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany
3 Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (IMIBE), University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany
4 Department of Neurology, University of Duisburg-Essen, University Hospital Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen,Department of Neurology, Evangelical Hospital Unna, Holbeinstr. 10, 59423 Unna,EVEX Medical Corporation, Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia,IM Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (Sechenov University), Moscow, Russian Federation, Germany
5 Institute for Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, Heinrich-Heine-University, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf, Germany

Correspondence Address:
Eman Alkhalawi
Centre for Urban Epidemiology (CUE), Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (IMIBE), University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany and Department of Family and Community Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Rabigh, Saudi Arabia.
Germany
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/nah.NAH_1_20

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Context and aim: The link between headaches and exposure to loud noise in occupational settings has been established. However, the effect of less intense but chronic residential traffic noise exposure on headache occurrence is less clear. Settings and design: We included 3,025 participants from the Heinz Nixdorf Recall study in Germany for this cross-sectional analysis. Methods and material: Residential road traffic noise exposure at the 2006–2008 address was modelled in A-weighted decibels (dB(A)) according to the European Noise Directive (2002/49/EC) for 24-hour (Lden) and night-time noise (22-6 h, Lnight). Indoor traffic noise exposure was obtained by modifying Lden and Lnight based on residence orientation, window type, and personal window opening habits. Traffic noise exposure below 55, 45 dB(A), 35 and 25 dB(A) were set as the reference for Lden, Lnight, Lden,indoor and Lnight,indoor, respectively. Average number of days with headache per month over the past three months was ascertained during the follow-up (2011–2015) medical interview. Statistical analysis used: Prevalence Odds Ratios (POR) of having eight or more headaches per month per 5 dB(A) increase in traffic noise exposure were calculated using logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, sport, number of chronic conditions, years of education and smoking status. Results: The mean age of participants was 58.3. Mean Lden was 54 dB(A). Median monthly headache days was one. No association was seen between traffic noise exposure and having ≥8 headaches/month for all the examined traffic noise indicators. However, traffic noise was positively associated with traffic noise-annoyance and insomnia; and night-time traffic noise-annoyance and insomnia were positively associated with headache. Conclusion: In conclusion, our data did not provide any evidence for an association between chronic traffic noise exposure and prevalence of headaches at this population’s exposure levels. This should be explored in different populations given that this is the first study of its type and that noise exposure was generally low in our population.






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