Home Email this page Print this page Bookmark this page Decrease font size Default font size Increase font size
Noise & Health  
 CURRENT ISSUE    PAST ISSUES    AHEAD OF PRINT    SEARCH   GET E-ALERTS    
 
 Next article
 Previous article
Table of Contents

Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
Citation Manager
Access Statistics
Reader Comments
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed222    
    Printed8    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded0    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 

 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 108  |  Page : 35--41

Negative responses to urban residential noise as a social rebound effect of increasing population density: Legislative challenges and auditory territoriality


Environmental Psychology, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, University of Gävle,School of Arts, University of Pretoria, South Africa, Sweden

Correspondence Address:
Douglas MacCutcheon
Environmental Psychology, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, University of Gävle
Sweden
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/nah.NAH_45_18

Rights and Permissions

Populations in cities are projected to increase globally, densifying urban residential environments with both positive and negative effects. Positive social effects are offset by negative health effects however; urban residential noise has been identified in a large number of studies as a significant contributor to social unrest as well as a risk to physiological and psychological health caused by stress, making this topic highly relevant to the discussion on sustainability urban growth. Focusing on the psychological rebound effect of urban residential noise, this paper attempts to explain how and why auditory aspects of the spatial environment negatively influences urban residents. To provide context and to indicate areas in need of improvement, the legislative challenges to be faced are considered, with Sweden as a prime example of a first world country grappling with the effects of increased urban density. Existing building legislation regarding residential noise is considered in relation to studies investigating the effects of residential noise on psychological and physiological health, outlining areas in need of future development. Then, health responses to residential noise are placed in a broader evolutionary context by considering how these effects might be the result of triggered evolutionary mechanisms for keeping population size optimal. Further, the spatial dimension of hearing is discussed with reference to theories of territoriality in environmental psychology and the concept of auditory territoriality is described.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article