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Year : 2011  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 51  |  Page : 113--121

Hearing loss prevention for carpenters: Part 1 - Using health communication and health promotion models to develop training that works

Carol Merry Stephenson1, Mark R Stephenson2 
1 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Education and Information Division, 4676 Columbia Parkway, C-10, Cincinnati, OH 45226-1998, USA
2 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Division of Applied Research and Technology, 4676 Columbia Parkway, C-27, Cincinnati, OH 45226-1998, USA

Correspondence Address:
Carol Merry Stephenson
NIOSH- Taft Lab, 4676 Columbia Parkway, C-10, Cincinnati, OH 45226-1998
USA

In phase 1 of a large multiyear effort, health communication and health promotion models were used to develop a comprehensive hearing loss prevention training program for carpenters. Additionally, a survey was designed to be used as an evaluation instrument. The models informed an iterative research process in which the authors used key informant interviews, focus groups, and early versions of the survey tool to identify critical issues expected to be relevant to the success of the hearing loss prevention training. Commonly held attitudes and beliefs associated with occupational noise exposure and hearing losses, as well as issues associated with the use or non-use of hearing protectors, were identified. The training program was then specifically constructed to positively shape attitudes, beliefs, and behavioral intentions associated with healthy hearing behaviors - especially those associated with appropriate hearing protector use. The goal was to directly address the key issues and overcome the barriers identified during the formative research phase. The survey was finalized using factor analysis methods and repeated pilot testing. It was designed to be used with the training as an evaluation tool and thus could indicate changes over time in attitudes, beliefs, and behavioral intentions regarding hearing loss prevention. Finally, the training program was fine tuned with industry participation so that its delivery would integrate seamlessly into the existing health and safety training provided to apprentice carpenters. In phase 2, reported elsewhere in this volume, the training program and the survey were tested through a demonstration project at two sites.


How to cite this article:
Stephenson CM, Stephenson MR. Hearing loss prevention for carpenters: Part 1 - Using health communication and health promotion models to develop training that works.Noise Health 2011;13:113-121


How to cite this URL:
Stephenson CM, Stephenson MR. Hearing loss prevention for carpenters: Part 1 - Using health communication and health promotion models to develop training that works. Noise Health [serial online] 2011 [cited 2020 Dec 3 ];13:113-121
Available from: https://www.noiseandhealth.org/article.asp?issn=1463-1741;year=2011;volume=13;issue=51;spage=113;epage=121;aulast=Stephenson;type=0