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Year : 2015  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 78  |  Page : 245--252

Hearing in young adults. Part II: The effects of recreational noise exposure

Hannah Keppler1, Ingeborg Dhooge2, Bart Vinck3 
1 Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
2 Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
3 Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Department of Communication Pathology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa

Correspondence Address:
Hannah Keppler
De Pintelaan 185, 2P1, Gent - 9000, Belgium

Great concern arises from recreational noise exposure, which might lead to noise-induced hearing loss in young adults. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effects of recreational noise exposure on hearing function in young adults. A questionnaire concerning recreational noise exposures and an audiological test battery were completed by 163 subjects (aged 18-30 years). Based on the duration of exposure and self-estimated loudness of various leisure-time activities, the weekly and lifetime equivalent noise exposure were calculated. Subjects were categorized in groups with low, intermediate, and high recreational noise exposure based on these values. Hearing was evaluated using audiometry, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs), and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). Mean differences in hearing between groups with low, intermediate, and high recreational noise exposure were evaluated using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). There were no significant differences in hearing thresholds, TEOAE amplitudes, and DPOAE amplitudes between groups with low, intermediate, or high recreational noise exposure. Nevertheless, one-third of our subjects exceeded the weekly equivalent noise exposure for all activities of 75 dBA. Further, the highest equivalent sound pressure levels (SPLs) were calculated for the activities visiting nightclubs or pubs, attending concerts or festivals, and playing in a band or orchestra. Moreover, temporary tinnitus after recreational noise exposure was found in 86% of our subjects. There were no significant differences in hearing between groups with low, intermediate, and high recreational noise exposure. Nevertheless, a long-term assessment of young adults«SQ» hearing in relation to recreational noise exposure is needed.


How to cite this article:
Keppler H, Dhooge I, Vinck B. Hearing in young adults. Part II: The effects of recreational noise exposure.Noise Health 2015;17:245-252


How to cite this URL:
Keppler H, Dhooge I, Vinck B. Hearing in young adults. Part II: The effects of recreational noise exposure. Noise Health [serial online] 2015 [cited 2021 Jan 17 ];17:245-252
Available from: https://www.noiseandhealth.org/article.asp?issn=1463-1741;year=2015;volume=17;issue=78;spage=245;epage=252;aulast=Keppler;type=0